Clarifying Interior Design Titles and Labels.

If you attended an educational program that granted you a certificate upon completion- that does NOT mean you are “certified” interior designer. If you passed the NCIDQ Examination- that does NOT mean you are a “licensed” interior designer. If you received an interior architecture degree from a CIDA accredited school- that does NOT mean you are […]

In Defense of Interior Decoration?

https://www.stevenstolmaninc.com/single-post/2017/07/16/In-Defense-of-Decorators   On the surface the above blog post ruffled my PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER feathers….Mr. Stolman clearly blurs the line between interior decoration and Interior Design which is a particular sore point with moi……..but. While I appreciate Mr. Stolman’s impassioned plea for relevance I wonder if interior decoration just might wither away.  Maybe interior decoration will become […]

Hey Farooq…..Maybe it’s Time to Change Your Business Model

http://www.newstimes.com/business/article/Ethan-Allen-re-ups-CEO-next-up-designers-6551652.php

Maybe, just maybe, if you considered Interior Design as valuable service and not a free hook to lure in the occasional big sale your staff might earn a bit more respect and increase their sales, and your profit, via ethical business practices.

But what do I know?

PROUD TO DISPLAY THE NEW NCIDQ CREDENTIAL

Introducing New Benefit
For Active Certificate Holders

On July 15, 2013 the appellation “NCIDQ” and a unique mark will be available for use as an additional benefit for active certificate holders. After completing the terms and conditions on their MyNCIDQ online account, active NCIDQ Certificate holders will have the option to sign their names “First Name Last Name, NCIDQ” and/or use a unique NCIDQ logo in their professional materials, which may be downloaded from the same online account. Active NCIDQ Certificate holders are those individuals who are current with their annual renewal payment, and in addition to the benefits already funded by the annual renewal fees, helps support NCIDQ Examination development and operations to maintain the validity and integrity of the series of tests.

Kim Ciesynski, NCIDQ Examination Board President, praises the move, saying “This new option for all certificate holders is a great opportunity for interior designers/interior architects to promote the NCIDQ credential they have worked so hard to earn, and to market themselves as successfully passing the rigorous standards tested by the NCIDQ Examination. The NCIDQ Examination is developed according to credible industry standards and we take great care to maintain its validity. Therefore, we are very proud of our certificate holders and so pleased that they will now be able to demonstrate that they incorporate the highest standards of health, safety and human welfare in their daily practice. Certificate holders have spent years educating themselves, earning work experience and studying for the NCIDQ Examination. They deserve the ability to showcase their hard-won and unique achievement.”

The Council for Interior Design Qualification, Inc., the corporate structure that provides resources to develop the NCIDQ Examination, is confident in the skills of those professionals who hold the NCIDQ Certificate, and is thrilled to promote those interior designers/interior architects who are the best examples of what the NCIDQ Examination stands for: health, safety and welfare within the spaces we use daily.

FIGHTING THE WHITE BOX DIY OVERNIGHT ON A DIME MAKEOVER SYNDROME

Thanks to HGTV interior design will forever (well our lifetime’s at least) be defined as the ability of overly dramatic creative people to take a white box, or poorly decorated room, and to turn it into something all together different in an unreasonable time frame with very limited funds. Here the Washington Post has been promoting the DIY makeover via this popular (read the comments) ongoing feature;

http://www.washingtonpost.com/2010/07/08/AGq2iIhH_page.html

This unfortunately is what many HGTV fans and DIY decorators across the land think of when they hear the term “interior design” or “interior designer”. Here is an example of the same white box syndrome being used as a marketing tool by a Maryland based residential designer;

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/house-calls-local-rooms-get-virtual-design-makeovers/2012/01/31/gIQAPJp3JR_gallery.html#photo=1

The question I keep asking myself as I scroll through image after image of before and after white box (and a few green box) make-overs is “Is this really interior design”?

And the answer I keep coming back with is “Yes”! Can the designer, who apparently has no credentials or professional affiliations, call herself an interior designer? Much to the chagrin of many who have endeavored to prove their professional interior design status via education/experience/examination and legislation the answer is “YES”.

I know we want to be respected for doing more than simply making a room “cozy”. I don’t have the answer….well yes I do….read my 250 previous posts….but as long as we sit back and let others define our profession we need to accept it.

Rant over. Peace Out

Design Star or Design Scourge

PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER told himself not to continue punishing his hyper-sensitive identity complex by subjecting himself to another season of HGTV’s Design Star series. But lo I cannot avoid it. The HGTV juggernaut is omniscient- it is like being forced, with eyes propped open, to watch a slow motion train/school bus collision. The promotion of the series and its impact on the profession of interior design is unavoidable and in my not so humble opinion……devastating.