WILL WE EVER GET THIS RIGHT?

SEE 10/14/14 UPDATE BELOW At first I was concerned by the misinformation posited by the September 17th Huffington Post article “Arbitrary Interior Design Regulations Hurt Entrepreneurs, Consumers”. Much to our chagrin the Huff post has a pretty broad reach. Hats off to the Institute for Justice and their continued ringing of this bell. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/hilary-gowins/arbitrary-interiordesign-_b_5830782.html?utm_hp_ref=business&ir=Business At […]

STATE OF THE INTERIOR DESIGN INDUSTRY 2014

I commend ASID for issuing their annual take on the state of the “industry”. Previously I commented on the choice of “industry” vs. “profession” but of course ASID has to cast as broad of a membership net as possible. You should know by now where I stand on this semantic twist.

But of course there is something else for us to consider here. There is a statement in the Dexigner article that really needs to be drilled down lest it become just another ad hominem, purely rhetorical pitch, with no real purpose other than to placate. I do not know if it was part and parcel of ASID’s presentation or Dexigner’s spin on the topic but the statement could not be more true- to wit:

“These data, coupled with an increase in the popularity of “DIY design,” suggest that the industry needs to communicate its value more effectively. Interior designers bring to the table vital knowledge about health, well-being, sustainability, ergonomics and acoustics as well as expertise in building codes, standards and regulations. Interior designers also are well-versed in project and materials management.”

Once again the choice of term used to describe the profession as “industry” already convolutes the premise of the statement. But from PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER’s standpoint who ever said it could not have stated the larger issue with our…..ahem….”industry” more succinctly.

Begs several questions though; Who’s table is it? Who is invited to the table? and how exactly are we going to communicate all of this?

I know where to get a good table and some comfy chairs- let’s figure this out.

THE FUTURE OF INTERIOR DESIGN

ACCORDING TO ASID Pretty bold title.  As an interior designer, who is somewhat curious about the future of my profession, I was intrigued.  If you are also interested in the future of your chosen profession – here is the publicly accessible article. READ PAGES 28-29 FIRST: http://browndigital.bpc.com/publication/?i=199326 PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER concurs- interior design regulation should be seen […]

WHAT’S NEW ON THE INTERIOR DESIGN TITLE FRONT

JOIN ME FOR ANOTHER PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER INSTALLMENT OF:

WHO AM I AND WHAT IS IT THAT I DO?

There have been some interesting movements recently by professional and regulatory entities to clarify the “profession” of Interior Design and how it is, or should be, perceived by the general public.

First and most significant is this missive from the current president of IIDA, Felice Silverman;

“IIDA exists to provide relevant and meaningful support to Commercial Interior Design professionals and their clients. IIDA promotes the value of Interior Design to business decision makers and to the general public. IIDA stands at the intersection of passion and strategy where Designers create the exceptional environments that encompass every aspect of the human experience.

IIDA is the preeminent association for the Commercial Interior Design profession.” (from IIDA membership email)

Note the use of “commercial” interior design in the title. This semantic shift, while not surprising, is further evidence that ASID and IIDA are not planning on a merge any time soon…within this millenium…..as long as humanity exists….till the end of time. This is clearly IIDA’s solution to the age old identity crisis that the terms “interior design” and “interior designer” have struggled with. Don’t do “commercial” interior design?- Then join ASID or IDS. Seems easy enough.

Unfortunately there are far deeper implications for such a semantic cleaving of the professional domain.

Second and on a state level the This is excerpt from a letter to all Tennessee ID schools from the Tennessee Board of Architectural & Engineering Examiners:

December 26, 2013

Dear Interior Design Program Administrators/Educators:

Re: Use of term “interior architecture”

At its planning session arid meeting on October 9-11, 2013, the Board of Architectural and Engineering Examiners discussed the issue of use ot the term “Interior architecture” by interior design programs. Although the vast majority of programs accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) employ the term “interior design,” a growing number of interior design programs are describing themselves as “interior architecture” programs.
Following discussion of this issue, the Board voted to oppose use of the term “interior architecture” by interior design programs, and instructed that a letter be sent to Tennessee colleges and universities with architecture and interior design programs advising them of the Board’s position. “Interior architecture” is not legally recognized as a profession in Tennessee, and a national exam does not exist for this profession. In the context of the design and construction of buildings intended for human occupancy, the appellation “architect” should be reserved for licensed architects in order to avoid misleading the general public.

While on a state level issue the precendent set here by the TBAEE is interesting. It will be interesting to see if other regulatory boards issue a similar edict to their academic programs.

SO IF NOT HS&W THEN WHAT?

PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER tries not to focus on the confused state of our professional membership organizations but when I happened upon this FAQ result from ASID’s website I had to do a triple take.
Home » Frequently Asked Questions

Is there any limitation on the subject matter of the courses I take?
Submitted by shorouk on Tue, 2012-10-09 16:52

No. ASID is not imposing any CEU mandates for health, safety and welfare coursework at this time. We encourage you to select coursework that supports your own professional development plan and advances your professionalism as an interior designer.

Is it just me or does it concern anybody that the membership organization that supposedly represents the profession, vis-a-vis the “industry”, does not care to impose some sort of expectation for professional development and continuing education based on the entire reason we can claim that we are in fact a profession?

Hello……KNOCK KNOCK…..is anybody home?

But then again who am I to FAQ of the FAQ’s?

I Wonder What it is to be a Certified Professional Interior Designer……..

I wonder what our promotional video might say.

Here is one from the AIA that prompted this post;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPNDt8mSdsQ

This video is part of the AIA’s Repositioning effort. They realized the need for change and they are trying to do something about it…….

Will the above video and related Repositioning videos make a difference?

I don’t think it will go viral but at least they are trying. The message is powerful and could be parsed into several P.R. campaigns aimed at the general public;

“IT’S LOOKING AT AN EMPTY SPACE AND SEEING A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES”

“IT’S TRANSFORMING A COMPLEX PROBLEM INTO A BRILLIANTLY SIMPLE SOLUTION”

“IT’S BELIEVING THAT THE WAY OUR SURROUNDINGS ARE DESIGNED CAN CHANGE THE WAY WE LIVE”

Wow I wish I had thought of that.

At this point in our effort to validate the profession of interior design the only group that is coming close to this level of outreach is the IFI and their declaration; http://ifiworld.org/img/597IFI%20Interiors%20Declaration%20-%20ORIGINAL.pdf

I continue to applaud their effort but wish we could capitalize on it domestically…the whole IA vs. ID thing is a hurdle not to mention the global reach of IFI making it hard for the message to filter down beyond the practitioners. A major feat in itself.

So once again- what is our message and who will step up to shout it out?

TWO YEARS GONE…….HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!

So it’s been two years and almost 300 rants since PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER went live….actually I was alive for 51 years prior but who is counting?

I hope to follow this up with a terrible two’s retrospectively synoptic analysis of how this blog changed the professional interior design world……or not…mostly not…..Okay I didn’t change anything but my underwear but others did….somewhat…..Okay not enough. Till then I have to address something that came across the wire this morning.

Design Success University’s 2013 Interior Design Fee & Salary Survey reveals a shocking statistic: 23.2% of all interior designers left the industry between May 2008 and May 2011 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The free eBook is available for immediate download.

Read more here: http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/01/08/4527942/shocking-statistic-revealed-in.html#storylink=cpy
So according to DSU, government statistics verify that nearly one-quarter of all interior design jobs were lost in the 4 year period from ’08 to ’11. WOW. I am well aware that the profession, or industry as ASID calls it, took a hit in the 2008 downturn but did we really shed a fourth? So I tasked my investigative research team to confirm the data.
After an exhaustive analysis of U.S.B.L.S. data (read 30 minute webscan) I can say that yes…overall those who claim “interior design” as their chosen occupation did suffer such losses. That anybody lost their job is tragic but I still found it hard to swallow that professional interior designers took such a hit. Well they, the professionals, did not.
As inferred above the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not distinguish the innately qualified self-proclaimed interior designers from trained/educated and vetted professionals. So my researchers drilled deeper into the statistics (read scanned more of the webpage) to find that ‘interior designers” are included in two categories. Architecture & Engineering Occupations (17-0000) and Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media Occupations (27-0000).
http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes271025.htm
When looking at those interior designers categorized in 17-0000 there was only a 14% reduction in jobs over the same period. Which in my biased opinion indicates that those who have endeavored to align themselves with other vetted/licensed design professions MAY be less prone to the whims of the economy. A point the DSU P.R. blurb fails to clarify.
Regardless none of this is positive news but as long as we exist in an occupation/industry/profession that includes everyone from retail window dressers
to those designing living and working environments that physiologically improve the quality of the occupants lives – I will still have a job at PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER

Turning Up the Heat on Registered Interior Designers in Texas

Texas Sunset ADVISORY Commission stands behind deregulating Registered Interior Designers despite overwhelming opposition.

PROFESSIONALINTERIORDESIGNER is trying to stay on top of the effort to deregulate interior design in Texas….which from the middle of Kansas is easier said than done. If I get any of this wrong please let me know.

Here is the latest update from the Texas Sunset Advisory Commission;

http://www.sunset.state.tx.us/83rd/eng/eng_dm.pdf

Here from page #20 o is the key sentence “Staff Recommended Action
Adopt Recommendations 1.1 through 1.4.”

I am not a rocket surgeon but I read that as…despite overwhelming and compelling requests/testimony to deny the Advisory Commission’s recommendation to deregulate interior design in Texas, the Commission is still hell bent on making it happen. NOT COOL.

To make matters worse Texas State Representative Bill Callegari is on the warpath to roll back state regulation of all sorts…including interior design;

http://www.house.state.tx.us/news/press-releases/?id=4129&session=82&district=132&bill_code=2295

So Texas Registered Interior Designers…..the sun is getting lower on your horizon.